UPS Overload and Bypass: CT Scanner Load

A quick consulting project came over the transom this week. A 150 KVA UPS, protecting a CT scanner, was occasionally overloading and transferring to bypass.

UPS Bypass 02

Here, the transition to Bypass is evident by the step change in voltage from a rock solid 480 VAC (UPS Inverter) to a very high 515 VAC (Bypass)

UPS Bypass 01

Drilling in a bit more, we see the CT Scanner switch on (point “A”) with a maximum current of 245 Amps and a resultant collapse of the UPS output, a short period where the CT current drops and the UPS output stabilizes, then a transition to Bypass (point “B”). Note the increase in voltage while operating on Bypass.

At the end of the CT scan (point “C”) the voltage rises due to impedance. And the UPS stays in Bypass for an extended period (point “D”) needing to be manually reset.

UPS Bypass 03

A close-up of the “start of scan” waveform shows the nature of the inrush current (higher for just once cycle) – although the UPS voltage drops more than usual, it does not really fold or collapse.

Nothing really unusual here – some finger pointing at impedance (not really an issue, the voltage drop on the unregulated bypass was just 2.7% at full load) and voltage distortion (under 3% voltage distortion on the UPS input) – neither of which is a problem. The UPS got sized in based on power monitoring, which apparently did not capture peak load condition.

I suggested that the higher voltage on Bypass (515 VAC = 7% higher than nominal) would mean lower observed current, although that did not factor into the calculations (they were monitoring further upstream on a 208 VAC source). The UPS vendor is going to see if they can tweak the protection circuitry a bit to be able to survive and supply this short overload without a bypass transition.

Remembering Joe Briere

I found out this morning that Joe Briere of Computer Power Northeast passed away back in March – obituary.

Joe and I go back a long ways. When I worked at Philips Medical in Shelton (pre-1995) he stopped in a few times to see if there was any business there; he was plying his trade as a power quality consultant in the medical imaging field, doing a lot of work with Siemens Medical, so it was natural that our paths would cross. He was one of those “I’ll help you with your power quality issues and maybe sell a transformer, voltage regulator, power conditioner, Uninterruptible Power Supply, or Surge Protective Device along the way” kind of consultants that inevitably made a lot more money than me (who chose not to sell or rep products, just provide technical services). He was always a straight-shooter, never found him to oversell or over-promise, and was a hands-on guy who knew his way around grounding, the electrical code, isolation transformers, etc. We did not agree on everything, but I always respected his opinions and experience.

For a few years there (2001 – 2003) Joe and I would often find ourselves meeting at Siemens trouble sites across the country as the service organization tried to get a handle on power and grounding issues, so I got to know him pretty well, poking around hospital electrical systems and sharing a beer and a meal afterwards.

Have not been in contact for many years (my last contact with Joe was 2003, and with Computer Power Northeast was 2009) but I’d pop over to the website now and then to see if they were still in business. Joe was probably retirement age when I started working closely with him, and reportedly kept busy well into his 80’s. His business partner called for a little consulting project this morning and shared the news.

Was a long time ago in a galaxy far, far away. Power Quality Consulting was kind of the wild west back then and the folks who knew what they were doing, were not afraid to open an electrical panel and make some measurements, and could sort out technical issues that left others scratching their heads were a rare breed. RIP, old friend.