Backups and Archives

We’re in the process of re-organizing our office back-ups and archives.

For a while now, we’ve had a 1TB D-Link mini-server, dual parallel drives, serving as a backup device. It’s been getting full – so we decided to review and revamp. Turns out a big chunk of that drive (700 GB, at the moment) is devoted to one client, and an archive of site data and reports that go back nearly 15 years. In the early days the data sets were relatively small (by today’s standards) – 10 or 20 MB maximum. But today, we regularly see data sets that exceed 1GB.

So, new plan, we picked up a relatively low cost, 4TB backup drive (USB connection) and are moving all of the customer data over there. There’s no real requirement for this data to be backed up permanently, it’s more of a “nice to hang on to” archive. That way, we can free up the 1TB drive (still nicely serviceble and redundant as an automated backup device) for everything else.

What this requires, however, is patience. In the process of copying 700GB of data from the network drive to the USB drive is taking some time (days really); it’s slowing down my main workstation a bit but not enough for me to set up something else to handle the chore.

Once the data gets pushed to the new drive, I’ll clean up the old backup drive, and also clear out some space on my main workstation and spend some time defragging the disks.

 

RIP: MCM Electronics

From the ARRL Website (9/21/17):

MCM Electronics, in business for 40 years, will close two plants and its corporate headquarters in Ohio and lay off more than 90 workers, the Dayton Daily News reported earlier this summer. The company, which carries an electronics inventory of more than 300,000 items, including 3-D printers, tools, wire, cable, and other items, has been a Dayton Hamvention® vendor.

The layoffs will begin at month’s end and continue through the end of the year.

You can now find the MCM Electronics catalog on the Newark.com site:

MCM Electronics and Newark element14 have partnered together for over 32 years as part of the Premier Farnell family. Now, MCM will be strengthening this partnership under the Newark name. MCM’s unique product offering combined with Newark’s vast inventory, expanded services and global reach makes us the one stop shop for engineers, installers, educators and makers.

MCM Electronics and I go back a long ways. I’m pretty sure my first purchase was a set of Spin Tite nut drivers; I’d found them super handy in the labs at my first job at Superior Electric and soon after purchasing my first home I outfitted a workbench. Still have that small set of color-coded, english gauged drivers. Over the years I bought oddball tools and test equipment, parts and components, and most recently audio-video equipment. I’ve got a storage locker full of A/V gack: LED Par Lamps; speakers, speaker stands, lighting stands, lighting truss, XLR and speaker cables. Often purchased via one of the seemingly insane 50% off sales that would periodically flood my physical mailbox. MCM Electronics seemed to be one of the last bastions of physical catalogs; I still have their last catalog on my shelf.

Why yes, I did buy four of the 12″ PA speakers at $44.99 each…

It was never the highest quality stuff, but it was light duty, serviceable, good enough for my needs.And for whatever reason, their shipping department seemed to be amazingly responsive – I’d order stuff “slow boat” and it would show up 1-2 days later; big boxes of speakers or truss or whatever.

And while stuff still seems to be available, I have no doubt that the selection will narrow, the catalogs will stop coming, the to good to be true sales prices that often enticed me to buy will no longer be offered.

End of an era. There’s a lot of that going ’round in my world these days….

 

Engineering Templates

Popped up on Facebook this week; a friend posted some guitar innards and a commenter referenced engineering templates – and it was off to the races.

Picket 16101

Picket 1610I – A personal favorite by dint of the transformers and the Delta-Wye transformer windings

Which is more terrifying:

  • I’m of an age where I actually used these for their intended purpose?
  • I still have these?
  • I knew exactly where they were? They’ve sat waiting patiently in the hanging file folder I put them in when I started consulting in ’95.

Apparently one can still purchase these – although I’m not sure how many are sold. I’ve not seen a drafting table in use (except perhaps ironically) for many years.

Truth be told my love affair with these tools goes back much further – Dad worked in IT back when the Univac brand was on top of the industry, and weekend trips to his office meant a morning of messing around with programming templates, making punch cards, shooting big rubberbands (used to bundle punch cards or print-outs). Every year at xmas we’d get a dot-matrix, ascii art peanuts calendar – I found a pretty representative sample at Hackaday.