How to Annoy Your Friendly Neighborhood Electrical Engineer

Problem Statement: A power assist chair (that we purchased for my mother back in 2016 and no longer need, looking to sell used) had an intermittent – the up/down LED lamps would go out, and the chair would not operate, until one jiggled the power cord.

Annoyance #1: Called the manufacturer to get a replacement cord (I had troubleshot it down the cord itself). Turns out the cord is hard-wired into the motor, so the solution is to replace the motor. (bad answer, the motor itself is fine). Why is a simple power cord that will invariably get a bit of wear and tear not be easily replaceable?

Annoyance #2: Yes, it’s under warranty, but it requires both a service call (to replace the motor) and shipping charges. Um, no.

Annoyance #3: Additionally troubleshot the cable and discovered the intermittent was in a little inline molded box containing an LED, the sole purpose of which (as far as I can see) is as a redundant and unnecessary troubleshooting tool – since both the chair control pendant and the transformer also have LEDs to indicate power on.

Solution: Cut the molded box LED out, strip and splice the cable (nicely soldered and insulated), it’s a wee bit kludgy with electrical tape, but perfectly safe and solid). Took about 15 minutes including time to heat up the soldering iron and then test the crap out of it afterwards.

Ultracomfort America – not impressed.

Audio Project: Buying Local vs. Amazon

I’m in the middle of a small audio project – converting 11 digital micro-cassettes (the sort used in old answering machines and personal recorders) to digital MP3 files for a client’s book / memoir project. It’s potentially slogging work (each cassette has up to 90 minutes of content, that’s up to 16.5 hours of recording) but I’ve got it set up to run in the background, while I do other things. I’m sort of embarrassed to admit that I started doing this on my computer (using Audacity sound recorder / editor) before realizing I have this perfectly good TASCAM DR-07 digital recorder (that I use for live recording) that is actually designed for this sort of thing. Using the computer would have been exceptionally onerous; the digital recorder makes it almost trivial. The only potential problem is battery life on the micro-cassette – I picked up a DC power supply but it introduced severe hum into the signal so I’m back to AAA batteries (I have a stack of those, but I imagine that the batteries will die mid-recording a few times during the process.

I’m probably over-killing the set-up here – running the 2.5mm mono output of the recorder through adapters (2.3mm -> 3.5mm -> 1/4″), then through a DI to get XLR out, and into a Mackie mixer to tweak the sound a bit (cutting out some of the highs and lows, optimizing the level) and into the recorder. I’ve got a set of headphones to listen in now and then. Next time I’m out I’m going to pick up my spare monitor speakers at my storage locker so I can have it going low in the background and lose the headphones.

Getting the adapters was 1/2 the battle here – the 2.5mm mono out is super non-standard. I went to the local Cables & Connectors store which could only supply a 2.5mm stereo, which kind of sort of worked but not really (was a little flaky) – I ended up (as always) finding exactly what I needed at Amazon (2.5mm mono to 3.5mm stereo) and while I was at it, picked up a couple of 3.5mm stereo to 1/4″ breakout cables which I seem to be wanting every other time I pull out the mixer these days (record out to the TASCAM, line out from phones and tablets). I have a bunch of 3.5mm to RCA breakouts but the 1/4 is a lot more mixer friendly.

I like to support local retail when I can, but I’m invariably looking for something a little weird or left of center and rather than drive around all day for something that almost works, just pull up the exact right item on Amazon, order via Prime, and it shows up 1-2 days later. Probably better for the environment as well (considering my gas).